Asset 1.png

Like most kids, I was raised by cartoons

The funny thing about cartoons, is that they are jammed full of more product than adult television. A lot of what I picked up during that time comes out in my art. When you mix how I was raised with the social state of the world, you get a post Good Years vibe.

How we view each other and how we view things has taken a turn for the worst. We force feed snapshots of our lives to others and we obsess over the need to be seen. We treat ourselves like products. We believe everything we see, which leads us to design our lives around this fake reality, setting the bar for ourselves against heavily edited benchmarks. With this work, I want to look backwards from that position. I want to show you snapshots of evil, of misery, and build the impressions of some of our heroes through that spotlight.

anxiety.jpg
Asset 1.png
Asset 1.png

Do you love me?

It's a strange time to date. Nobody knows the rules anymore. Bae Goals is a commentary on how even our greatest heroes can be altered by an image. The heroes in our life with the strongest hearts and greatest history can look like crooks. 

Bae Goals.  40x40 inches. Acrylic on canvas.

Bae Goals. 40x40 inches. Acrylic on canvas.

BLANK.png
Asset 1.png

She said she'll never go

Take one invincible man. Remove context. Even the toughest people can be seen as weak. Who would have thought that someone that can't keep a pair of pants in one piece would be so possessive. Heroes are only heroes because we only show them saving lives. Even superheroes have assholes.

 

Bae Goals II.  30x40 inches. Acrylic on canvas.

Bae Goals II. 30x40 inches. Acrylic on canvas.

BLANK.png
Asset 1.png

She was pregnant, and you gunned her down

You can have all the power in the world. You can stop time, break down matter and see the future. You can also decide to let your partner shoot the woman who is pregnant with his child. This was the first image that really had me thinking about what we see, and the impact an individual image can have on context. Dr. Manhattan, the blue guy (Watchmen) fails at trying to talk his partner from shooting someone, an event he could have stopped just by thinking it. 

Losing Touch.  30x40 inches. Acrylic on canvas.

Losing Touch. 30x40 inches. Acrylic on canvas.

BLANK.png
Asset 1.png

No one can escape

Well, not anymore. We are at the constant whim of everyone around us. We hide our break downs and we hide our failures. Even the most invincible of us can have these moments, but we don't see this anymore because we only share success. Our lives are so focused on perfect people that we lose sight that every coin has two sides.
 

Anxiety.  30x40 inches. Acrylic on canvas.

Anxiety. 30x40 inches. Acrylic on canvas.

BLANK.png
Asset 1.png

Are you paying attention

Not even our mentors can escape. Someone as pure as a Disney character has his bad days, or moments. I guess we do live in a Disney world, where all the apples are red and no one is allowed to get mad. The question is, what world do we want to live in? What world are we moving towards?

Miseducation.  30x40 inches. Acrylic on canvas.

Miseducation. 30x40 inches. Acrylic on canvas.

BLANK.png
Asset 1.png

Where is the cream filling

Some things are rammed down our throats. The Twinkie should be the new symbol for opulence; something so useless it must be considered a luxury. We are raised to look up to products like this, to beg our parents for them, to cry, kick and scream when we don't get them. Twinkies is painted in a way to represent the snack as an idol, a golden statue of the American ideal. The fast-fleeting American ideal. 

Twinkies.  30x40 inches. Acrylic on canvas.

Twinkies. 30x40 inches. Acrylic on canvas.

BLANK.png
Asset 1.png

In God we trust

The father the son and the holy spirit. The Oreo, the milk and the impulse purchase. A commentary on our new found product worship. We may not go to church anymore, but we still pray to something. That something, unfortunately, will not save us. In an era where religion is being scrutinized, is it only natural that we turn to some other golden idol?

Covenant.  50x70 inches.   Acrylic on canvas.

Covenant. 50x70 inches. Acrylic on canvas.

BLANK.png
Asset 1.png

Always death by diabetes

The original, or the classic. Diabetes kills 3.4 million people in America every year. So what do you see? On one level its just a drink, but on the other, the cause of serious health problems. For some, a very profitable business.

Tell Me.  24x36 inches .  Acrylic on canvas.

Tell Me. 24x36 inches. Acrylic on canvas.

BLANK.png
Asset 1.png

Cover up

As we have to exhibit our beauty, we drown in a feeling that we aren't good enough. Aren't good enough for what? It doesn't matter because we have make up to fix that. Drowning for the sake of profits, profits provided by insecurity.

Avon.  24x36 inches. Acrylic on canvas.

Avon. 24x36 inches. Acrylic on canvas.

BLANK.png
Asset 1.png

The kids are next

We move from a mindset where we imagine everything. We spend our lives deciding how we see things. We imagine, we believe, we create. Then, we grow up and we are told how the world is. The thing is, its not the world, its just what we are being told. In Good Youth, we see a hero, and we only see a snapshot of his life. That's all we ever see, but we are also seeing another world created by him. We know that this isn't real. Why? Because we know that Calvin is using his imagination. Why can't we apply this thinking to our social lives?

Good Youth.  40x60 inches. Acrylic on canvas.

Good Youth. 40x60 inches. Acrylic on canvas.

BLANK.png
Asset 5.png

Red walls and red bottoms

Sometimes you have to pay respect to your muses. What else are you supposed to do when you see a giant red wall sitting empty?

Bal Du Moulin Rouge.  40x70 inches. Acrylic on canvas.

Bal Du Moulin Rouge. 40x70 inches. Acrylic on canvas.

BLANK.png
Asset 1.png


BLANK.png